Newman in Five Minutes


Newman Littlemore

Fr. Hermann Geissler FSO

Dear brothers and sisters,

 

Today we celebrate the Memorial of Blessed John Henry Newman. As we know, after having read an anthology of this great English convert, Mother Julia said to the sisters around her: “My soul has found a brother”. Newman is very close to us, he is our brother, who intercedes for us and sustains us on our journey of faith. Let us recall one thought of Newman on faith. In his major work, “Grammar of Assent”, Newman describes how we come to give an assent to the truth, to the natural and to the supernatural truth. In this book he elaborates the distinction between notional assent and real assent.

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Catacomb of St Sebastian, Rome

Seán McLaughlin

In pagan Rome it was believed that immortality and greatness was ensured by the endurance of the remembrance of a person. It was this belief that gave rise to wonderful feats of architectural brilliance. At the same time, no greater punishment could one inflict on the Romans than to pronounce a damnation memoria – a condemnation of memory, in which every trace of them was obliterated. In Christian Rome, however,

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St Mary the Virgin

Seán McLaughlin

The Oxford Movement is rightly associated with its three main protagonists: Newman, Keble and Pusey. These Oriel dons provided the movement with the leadership, enthusiasm and intellectual rigor which would ensure its success, so much so that by the mid 1830s the influence of the Oxford Movement began to eclipse the hugely popular Evangelical Movement. Yet despite their greatness, the genesis, progress and consequences of the Oxford Movement cannot be reduced to Keble, Pusey and Newman alone. The movement is indebted to many men, who

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Seán McLaughlin

In a charming reflection Newman wrote while in the Birmingham Oratory he discusses why Catholics dedicate the month of May to Our Blessed Lady. Newman begins by considering how the natural course of the seasons, which in spring is full of life and bloom, should be a fitting image of Our Lady. Newman considers how as winter has passed and the darkness recedes new life appears on earth, so too Our Lady,

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Seán McLaughlin

Pilgrims and visitors arriving at Newman’s private room at Littlemore are often taken aback by the rather Spartan bedroom, cold floor and white washed walls. The frugal atmosphere of The College pales in stark contrast to what one would be

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Seán McLaughlin

In his Development of Christian Doctrine, Newman spoke of how ‘to live is to change, and to be perfect is to have changed often.‘ These memorable words are well known and often quoted, and it seems obvious that change was indeed a particular characteristic of his life. Although the question of what he retained from his Anglican years is a perhaps less obvious and therefore deserves some attention

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Seán McLaughlin

Lockhart remembered how Newman’s very name went before him: ‘I saw him first on a certain day which I vividly remember. I was walking down High Street-it was between All Souls‘ and Queen’s College. He was crossing, I think, to Oriel. My companion seized my arm, whispering to me, „Look, look there, that is Newman!“ I looked, and there I saw

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Seán McLaughlin

Nunquam minus solus, quam cum solus, was a phase which the eighteenth century London born poet, Abraham Cowley, claimed had been used with such frequency that every man and boy had it on his lips. The phrase derives from beginning of the third book of Cicero’s De Officis, and was

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Oxford Impressions

Seán McLaughlin

‚Surrender‘, ‚abandonment‘ and ‚trust‘ are very apt terms for describing what we understand by our experience of faith. Alternatively ‚Rational‘ may not come to mind so spontaneously.

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Seán McLaughlin

If we were to reflect on individuals who, throughout our lives, had in some way influenced the opinions we now hold and the decisions we have taken, many of us would be able to form quite a considerable list. Of course there were parents who nurtured our faith, friends with whom we shared interests with, and perhaps impressive figures in history to whom we aspired.

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